Home    Wireless Dog Fences How to Use a Pet Fence | The TechLines
Home » How to Teach Your Dog How to Use a Pet Fence

How to Teach Your Dog How to Use a Pet Fence

by sanjuislam230
Wireless Dog Fences

Wireless Dog Fences Training for pet fences must be fair, strict, consistent, and enjoyable at all times. We suggest training for at least 14 days. Training may proceed more swiftly depending on how quickly your pet learns new concepts. Your dog may need more than two weeks. Do not, however, attempt to do too much, too quickly.

Exercise for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Sessions should be kept shorter and more frequent rather than longer and less frequent. Adjust the training schedule, add more training days, or spend more time playing with your pet in his new small space if he shows signs of stress.

.On returning home, the leash is pulled

.Undocked ear

.Slipping back

.Body sagged.

.Tension or frantic movement

.Rigidity increasing in your pet’s physique

Your pet should feel completely comfortable around the Boundary Flags at the end of each training session. After each session, allow him at least 5 minutes of “play time” within 10 feet of the Boundary Flags to help him feel more at peace.

Always wrap off every training session with a lot of encouragement and enjoyable activities. Finish all of the training even if you think your pet is doing well. The significance of bolstering

Day 1: Boundary Awareness and Tone Only Training Mode

Complete three sessions of 10 to 15 minutes each on the first training day. The purpose of this first training session is to familiarize your pet with the warning beep from the receiver collar and the boundary flags that mark his new containment area. Wireless Dog Fences

Static Correction Level on the Receiver Collar should be set to Level 1, Tone Only Training.

Start by using a leash to guide your pet around the small space. Taking a step in the direction of the Boundary Flags while calmly praising and talking to your pet Keep everything upbeat.

With your pet on a leash, proceed to the flags while maintaining perfect control. The moment your pet enters the enclosed space, the Receiver Collar will begin to beep. Move your pet out of the containment area gently after allowing him to remain in the boundary zone for up to 2 seconds.

.When you step outside your pet’s new boundaries, immediately give him praise and a treat.

.Then, proceed to the next flag. Repeat this procedure at the same Boundary Flag. Per session, try to master 3–4 boundary flags. Find a method to amuse your dog with this!

.After each training session, your pet should feel entirely at ease close to the Boundary Flags. Spend at least 5 minutes of “play time” within 10 feet of the Boundary Flags after each training session to gauge his comfort level.

Days 2 through 4: Keep Boundary Awareness Alive and Introduce Static Correction

During this training period, perform three sessions of 10 to 15 minutes each. This stage aims to teach your pet to respect his new boundaries and remain within the confined area. Set the Receiver Collar’s static correction level to Level 2.

Repeat the steps in Phase One. If your pet does not respond to the static correction, confirm the Receiver Collar is fitting properly. If the Receiver Collar is fitted properly and your pet does not respond to the static correction, increase the level by 1.  Watch for slight reactions at first such as ears up, head turned, and looking at the ground.

Stay at the same flag until your pet resists going into the Boundary Zone.

5 – 8 days: the phase of distraction

During days 5-8, perform three sessions of 10 to 15 minutes each. This stage aims to teach your pet to remain in the confinement area in the presence of distractions outside of the safe place.

Depending on his response from days 2 through 4, set the static correction level on the receiver collar to Level 2 or higher.

While keeping complete control of your pet on a leash, provide diversions to tempt it to cross the boundaries.

Never, however, call or coax your pet away from the protected area. Here are some suggestions for diversion:

.Have a family member exit the containment area and enter another.

.Outside of the perimeter, swing a ball or throw a goodie

.Ask a neighbor to take their dog for a walk outside the house.

.Praise your pet and give it a treat if it doesn’t approach the distraction. Take your pet back into the confined area if he reacts to the distraction.

.Every time your pet enters the containment area, whether with assistance or not, give him a treat and praise.

.Use different distractions and repeat this approach.

As your pet continues to disregard the diversions and wanders back to the confined area by himself, gradually increase the distraction level.

Check the receiver collar’s fit if your pet doesn’t react to the static correction. If so, raise the level by 1 if your pet doesn’t react to the static correction.

Limit the level rise to 1 increment at a time.

If your pet exhibits any indications of anxiety or discomfort, stop and return to the previous level.

Related Posts